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20121208
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
head attachment. >>> well, we're going to talk about this person, the stalemate over the fiscal cliff, now the subject of a petition on the white house website. demands everyone in congress forfeit their paychecks and health care benefits until the deal is reached on the fiscal cliff. we'll be talking about whether -- we made a mistake earlier, if that person will make a difference for republicans not a representative. if nothing is worked out before the new year, it calls for a two-year, 15% pay cut for both the president and capitol hill lawmakers. so far 10,000 people have signed it. >>> t minus 24 days and counting until the nation could begin that dreaded slide down the fiscal cliff. we're going to get to that in just a moment. well, we're going to do that now. let's listen to house speaker john boehner, he had this to say. >> this isn't a progress report, because there's no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> joining me now, white house correspondent for the hill an
purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> new job numbers, fiscal cliff talks, legalized marijuana, all the news was fodder for late night comedians this week. >> some good news, some good news. the u.s. unemployment rate is now the lowest it's been in four years. or as makers of sweatpants put it, uh-oh. >>> climate rate has fallen through its lowest level in nearly four years. the bad news, most of those jobs involve wearing a red suit, a beard and having a kid pee in your lap. >> house speaker john bainers says his efforts to work with president obama on the fiscal cliff have resulted in a lot of talk but no action. yeah. a lot of talk but no action, or as they call that in college a date. >> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. victor is off today. it's 9:00 on the east coast. 6:00 a.m. out west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. we start this morning with the supreme court and the decision to hear two major cases on same-sex marriage. justices will hear arguments against the federal government's defense of marriage act and california's propo
cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over the debt ceiling. the closer we get to the debt line, the white house starts talking act what kind of specific impact this would have. in terms of the fiscal cliff, higher taxes on everybody. one thing that will happen without an agreement, all the bush tax rates go away, so everyone's taxes are going to go up. you'll see that emphasized over the next couple weeks. you'll hear the white house talk about what a bad situation there will be after january 1 if this deal is not cut. >> david jackson, "usa today," shira toeplitz, "roll call." we appreciate your time so much we'll talk to you later in the hour as well. >> thank
chairman of the democratic governors' association, who will talk about the fiscal cliff and laying the groundwork for the 2013 and 2014 elections. lives on sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern. next, a quick look at president obama and the first family last week at the national christmas tree lighting ceremony. ♪ [applause] >> merry christmas, everybody! >> it is great to see you all. happy holidays. happy holidays, mr. president. >> is it time? i think it's time. i hope everybody is ready. we have to do the countdown. starting with five. 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. [cheers] ♪ >> merry christmas, everybody. ♪ >> please welcome the director of washington and st. john's church. >> let us about our heads in prayer. let us prey. gracious god who has blessed us with this good land for our heritage, we humbly pray that we may always prove ourselves to be a people mindful of your favre and glad to do your will. we pray that you will save us from violence and confusion, from pride, arrogant, and fear of each other. defend our liberties and fashioned into one united people of the multitude brought here fr
the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. gwen: behind the scenes -- tea party pressure, as the movements most prominent senator builds a new platform. >> a lot of my role in the senate has been stopping bad things and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are work
that i am very concerned about the fiscal cliff but tearing up over besse cooper and the 8-year-old twins from oklahoma. what a morning you're having. >> what a life she had. >> amazing. >> well, let's talk about the cliff now that your eyes are dry. i hope this doesn't bring you to tears -- >> not yet. >> 24 days and counting until that deadline. but for the average american, what will it look like if we go off the cliff? will it be better for anyone? this is a very stressful time. you know, people talk about the cliff like it's this major event, which it is, but almost like a y2k. what are things going to look like january 2nd? from a paycheck perspective, you'll see less money in your paycheck if we do fall off the cliff. as far as the economy goes, not really a cliff. more like a slope and we are going to see most likely an economic slow down where jobs are going to slow down because we're not going to see companies expand. we're not going to be seeing them grow and this economy that we've been hoping to see in recovery really headed in the other direction. we can really face a recess
for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped looking. last month's drop in unemployment really was driven by people becoming employed. the fact the unemployment rate has dropped from over 10% over the last two or three years part of that is real job gaining by some people
here. if we all end up diving off this fiscal cliff, it doesn't make the deficit worse. it makes the deficit better. it would go a long way toward curing the deficit, but the deficit isn't the immediate problem for most people, the weak economy is. >> i agree. >> and if we dive off the fiscal cliff, the economy could get much weaker. that's -- >> by the way -- >> -- millions of americans. it's a problem for barack obama. >> just to back you up, i really think the great thing is the economy is just starting to lift up. the unemployment rate is really starting to come down. we're getting good job production. thank you so much, ladies, for coming on tonight. thanks for the sharp thinking we got tonight. >>> up next, if you can't win by the rules, change them. that's what republicans are trying to do in pennsylvania. they don't like the electoral college because it didn't work for them. come back for the place for politics. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows...
. with the countdown to the fiscal cliff at 24 days, the "washington post" reporting today that federal agencies are sharpening their plans before spending cuts, layoffs, fur lows and just general old down sizing. all if president obama fails to strike a deal, which i believe is increasingly likely. let's brung in distinguished fellow at the heritage foundation, form congressman old friend. ernie, i'm not shedding any tears over this. i think these fur lows and layoffs and downsizing is just what they need. >> i understand that the labor department report which came out today shows that 73% of the new jobs created since june are government jobs. we have 20 million people working for government at the federal, state and local level right now. and i can't tell you the exact mix between federal, state, local, but i do know that a huge number of the people who are on t payrolls are actually getting the money for those programs from the federal government. so the federal government should stop subsidizing states and cities and for that matter should not be putting extra burdens upon them with a lot o
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)